The Bible in a Year Podcast

Are you wanting to soak in more of God’s Word? Do you find yourself planning to spend more time with Scripture but then it doesn’t happen? Are you an auditory learner? Or perhaps you’re just not big on reading? Did you plan to finally read the Bible through in a year but fall off the wagon? If you answered yes to any of these questions or are just curious…read on!

Fr. Mike Schmitz, known to many through the Ascension Presents YouTube channel, has got, in my opinion, the greatest Scripture tool going this year and the best thing is you don’t have to have started on January 1st. You can jump in at any point with Day 1. Also, he’s very realistic about people falling off the wagon–been there, done that–and is extremely encouraging about just picking back up where you were and proceeding forward at your own pace. Such grace!

Anyway, here’s more about its unique approach to reading through the Bible in a year from one of the podcasting platforms where you can listen to it; it’s available wherever you normally listen as well (e.g., Apple Podcasts app).

About The Bible in a Year (with Fr. Mike Schmitz)

In The Bible in a Year podcast, Fr. Mike Schmitz walks you through the entire Bible in 365 episodes, providing commentary, reflection, and prayer along the way.

Unlike any other Bible podcast, Ascension’s Bible in a Year podcast follows a reading plan inspired by The Great Adventure Bible Timeline, a ground-breaking approach to understanding salvation history developed by renowned Catholic Bible scholar Jeff Cavins. For each period in the timeline, Jeff will join Fr. Mike for a special episode that will help you understand the context of each reading.

With this podcast, you won’t just read the Bible in a year … you’ll finally understand how all the pieces of the Bible fit together to tell an amazing story that continues in your life today!

Listen and…

  1. Read the ENTIRE Bible
  2. Feel more confident about your understanding of Scripture
  3. Experience the transformative power of God’s Word in your daily life
  4. Start seeing the world through the lens of Scripture

Each 20-25 minute episode includes:

Two to three scripture readings
A reflection from Fr. Mike Schmitz
A guided prayer to help you hear God’s voice in his Word

The Bible contains adult themes that may not be suitable for children – parental discretion is advised.

https://bibleinayear.fireside.fm/about

Moving Through Lent

For those of you who’ve been here before, this is an updated post from three years ago but the link is definitely still relevant, pandemic and life in general notwithstanding. Also, there is one other thing about Lent that’s new for me this year. “It’s not about what you give up it’s about who you become.” Thank you, Matthew Kelley, for summing up so well the essence of this liturgical season.

Wait! Before you get the link I just remembered a second thing that has stuck with me. Fr. Mike Schmitz said, in his homily on the first Sunday of Lent, “The heart of Lent is that we don’t trust God and we need to learn how to trust Him.” There. You. Go. Lent is all about loving God more, not just praying more, fasting more, and giving more, although these are all a part of the season and ways in which we show that love. The whole purpose of Lent is to become more Christ-like and that can only happen when we trust Him more. More trust equals more faith in Him.

Lent has been here since Ash Wednesday, of course, but on this Laetare (“Rejoice”) Sunday, in typical procrastinating fashion I’m just now taking the time to share something that my readers who observe Lent might find helpful. After all, we may be on the downhill run but we’ve still got three weeks to go! Below you will find–in my opinion–the best one-stop shopping (so to speak) for all things Lent from the wonderful Karen Edmisten.

So, grab your favorite acceptable Lenten beverage–I know some of you have painfully given up your precious Dr. Pepper or cozy cup of joe–settle into a comfy chair, and prepare to be informed, encouraged, and generally motivated to embrace this season in all of its unique challenges. Finally, I pray you and yours have, as Karen’s youngest daughter once said, “a meaningful Lent.” Blessings to you!

http://karenedmisten.blogspot.com/2018/02/its-back-meaningful-lent.html

Scribblings on the Sacred Heart

Oh Sacred Heart of Jesus
Please do not let me down
I want so much to grow and change
To turn my life around
If anyone can help at all
I know it must be You–
Waiting oh so patiently
For me to come to You.
Help me as a brother, please
Do not despise my pace
Of sloth and pride and
Everything else that got me in this place.
Be with me Gentle Jesus–
Take my heart and make it pure–
So I can do the next thing always
Just like that sacred heart of Yours.
 
Copyright 2019 Sabryna Noltie
 
The above verse just popped into my head this morning so I hurriedly scribbled it down. Then I read today’s daily mass readings for the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart of Jesus and they were so encouraging that I hope you’ll take the time to peruse them (http://usccb.org/bible/readings/062819.cfm).
 
Chocolate chip cookies will be served at dinner tonight for our celebration, plus I just began reading a young adult biography–Saint Margaret Mary and the Promises of the Sacred Heart of Jesus by Mary Fabyan Windeatt–that I had donated to our parish library when we finished homeschooling but before I had read it. It is devoted to telling the story of how she became the Apostle of the Sacred Heart and how the First Fridays devotion started (https://smile.amazon.com/St-Margaret-Mary-Promises-Sacred/dp/0895554151/ref=sr_1_fkmr2_1?keywords=saint+margaret+mary+fabyan+windeatt&qid=1561738470&s=gateway&sr=8-1-fkmr2).
 
Then, wonder of wonders, I made it to the First Friday mass this morning, something I haven’t felt well enough to do for a long time. Have a wonderful Friday and a special solemnity of the Sacred Heart!
 
 
 
 

Second Sunday in Advent: A Prayer for This Season

Yes, we’re now in the second week of Advent and life is just whizzing by–or at least it is for me and I suspect the same is true for you. If you could use some practical, realistic, non-guilt inducing inspiration for the season then this just might do the trick…

Prepare a way for you, Lord? I’ve got lots of work to do!

Help me prepare a way for you into my home, Lord:
help me find a place, a room, a corner, a chair
where you and I can meet each day to pray.
Perhaps I’ll put a candle there, with a Bible;
maybe a statue or a picture; a rosary or a prayer card:
something to mark the spot as the place I keep
to go each day to sit and rest, to take a deep breath,
to remember your presence and open my heart in prayer.

Help me prepare a way for you on my calendar,
an “appointment” each day;
even just ten minutes for you and me to get together,
to talk about the day, its ups and downs,
and get to know each other just a little better than yesterday.

Help me prepare a way for you to enter my thoughts, Lord.
When I’m trying to figure things out, nudge me
to ask for your guidance and counsel,
your Spirit and your wisdom,
when I’m making decisions and choices.
Help me prepare a way for you, Lord,
in my family and among my friends, at work and at school,
in my parish and in my neighborhood.
Help me prepare a way for you to come into the hearts
of those around me who are alone.

Help me prepare a way for you, Lord,
in the crazy rush of Christmas all around me.
Help me remember it’s your birthday
and that you should get some presents—from me.
Help me remember the poverty of your nativity:
make your way into my wallet and spend generously
on those whose needs are so much greater than my own.
Help me remember that of all the gifts I might receive,
none is greater than the love you have for me.

Help me prepare a way for you
to enter my life decisively, Lord.
In the quiet of my prayer, Lord,
help me clear the path you walk into my life, into my soul.

In the stillness of my prayer, Lord,
help me see you as you make your way towards me,
and show me that no matter the roadblocks I put up,
you’ll find a way to come, to enter,
and to fill me with your presence. Amen.

From Good Morning, Good God! by Fr. Austin Fleming, The Word Among Us Press, 2015, via

https://wau.org/resources/article/a_prayer_for_advent/

On Being Whole

For quite some time I have not posted and I wanted to let my readers know that–despite my silence–I am thankful for all of you. Between not doing well healthwise and writer’s block I just haven’t been able to muster up the mojo to get anything written. After talking with a wonderfully encouraging friend recently I decided to start back using baby steps: posting a quotation that I’ve run across and perhaps saying a few words about it. This way at least I’m getting over the hump of resuming posting on my always irregular basis…So, without any further ado, this Thanksgiving I just want to say how grateful I am for all my family and friends and readers and I hope to be more active again in the future. In the meantime, here are some words worth pondering…

“God did not tell us to follow Him because He needed our help, but because He knew that loving Him would make us whole.”

St. Irenaeus

A Wee Bit of Verse

 

Passion, poetry all unbending

To our greater understanding

What has been dark is now made light

In the early dawn that follows night.

 

Eye can’t see nor ear has heard

All the wonders of The Word

God Incarnate, Christ the Lion

Laying down His life for Adam’s scion.

 

Truth be told it all seems new

Yet familiar echoes in all is true

Waiting for the breaking dawn

When all will gather on Heaven’s lawn.

 

Until that Day we wait our life

Mindling hope, love, joy, and strife;

Our Creator awaits us there

When He welcomes us to His chair.

 

Copyright Sabryna Noltie

Looking to God

Currently I have been struggling with a new source of stress in a year–actually two, to be honest–of great frustration. As I caught myself starting to sink under the weight of the stress I reached out to God via all my characteristic ways of coping and held on for dear life to the assurance that God is in control. Still, the sense of being overwhelmed did not leave. Thoughts of the stressor constantly invaded my mind–thanks ever so much, anxiety disorder–and despite my repeated use of my faith tools I found myself sinking.

As soon as I could this past week I consulted an older and wiser dear friend who has seen much suffering in her life. Her observation was that perhaps I was looking at the problem too much and not at God enough. I reflected on that and realized she was right. In the necessary course of things there were tasks I had to complete as a result of the change in circumstances and yet once those were complete I was still wrestling with the whole thing instead of giving it to God. Clearly this was enough of a stressor that I would need to keep giving it back to Him in surrender to Divine Providence, which reminded me of a beloved book, Abandonment to Divine Providence. (NB–It is also translated as The Sacrament of the Present Moment and my preferred translator is Kitty Muggeridge.) Time to pull it out and start steeping myself in its truths as yet another tool to fight the battle of doubt and worry about how God will provide for us in all of our needs.

Is there anything you’re struggling with today? Perhaps you are–like me–getting a little too focused on the problem and not enough on the solution: looking to Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith (Heb 12:2). As we approach Thanksgiving and then the end of another liturgical year, with the feast of Christ the King to look forward to, may we be thankful that our God truly is ordering all things in our life together for good (Rom 8:28).

Faith is not a special way of feeling

Please take a moment to read this excellent summary of what faith is and what it is not from a favorite guest blogger.

Faith is not a special way of feeling.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: